Bhediya Review: Varun Dhawan-starrer werewolf drama is a howling entertainer and novelty

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Varun Dhawan plays the main protagonist in the supernatural suspense thriller, and Kriti Sanon plays his partner in the werewolf drama.
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Bhediya Review: Varun Dhawan-starrer werewolf drama is a howling entertainer and novelty
Bhediya Review: Varun Dhawan-starrer werewolf drama is a howling entertainer and novelty

Varun Dhawan and Kriti Sanon starrer ‘Bhediya’ hit the silver screens across the country on Friday. Bollywood’s attempt to explore the mythical werewolf world and the movie, belonging to the horror-comedy genre.

Varun Dhawan plays the main protagonist in the supernatural suspense thriller, and Kriti Sanon plays his partner in the werewolf drama.

After Stree, Bhediya is second in line of filmmaker Dinesh Vijan’s horror-comedy universe which is directed by Amar Kaushik. However, along with Varun and Kriti, Abhishek Banerjee, Deepak Dobriyal and Paalin Kabak playing supporting characters in the film.

The story of the film goes to the scenic dense forests of Arunachal Pradesh, where they are playing to build a road. The film begins with actor Sharad Kelkar narrating a story to his child in the forest, when suddenly he becomes the prey of a wolf. On the other hand, Delhi-based Bhaskar (Varun Dhawan) is working for Bagga (Saurabh Shukla) in his desire to become rich, super fast. Bhaskar lives in a house with his cousin Janardhan (Abhishek Banerjee).

Bhaskar, a road construction contractor from Delhi, arrives in the Arunachal Pradesh town of Ziro in the company of his slow-witted cousin Janardhan (Abhishek Banerjee). He has a blueprint that maps out the dimensions of a proposed infrastructure project that he has reasons to believe will transform the place completely.

The NSD alumni Paalin Kabak plays the local point person Jomin, who is there to assist the Delhi team in persuading the locals that a new route through the forest is urgently needed. In the movie, the division between the town elders, who revere the forest as a holy area, and the younger population, who are dependent on consumerist inducements that depend on technology and electronic gadgets, in Bhediya reflects the conflict between tradition and so-called modernity.

While returning to the hotel, Bhaskar is attacked by a wolf. This is where the real story begins, in which Jomin and Janardhanan take Bhaskar to the vet Anika (Kriti Sanon) after the attack. This metaphor about the thirst for money, the loss of greenery, and about mankind’s great propensity to ruin the ecosystem centres on the wolf bite that completely derail Bhaskar’s intentions.

After the attack of the wolf, Bhaskar starts changing and during the full moon night, he becomes a ‘wolf’, which he forgets in the morning. The film is very slow before the interval. But later you will start liking the chemistry of Janardan-Bhaskar-Jomin. Along with this, there is laughter on the dialogues of Abhishek Banerjee and Deepak Dobriyal.

Bhediya’s attitude toward the locale and its inhabitants is one of the novel’s key themes. He makes casual jokes at Jomin’s expense without regard for the latter’s sentiments, making fun of his Hindi and offensive assumptions. The casual verbal gaffes pose a threat of dividing the local guy and the Delhi boys and turning into a major plot point. The resolution takes a while to arrive, but when it does, the writing succinctly sums up the situation and its effects, if only in a way that is a little too direct.

The performances contribute to the enjoyment and thought-provoking nature of Bhediya. Varun Dhawan does his best in the unusual role. Both Paalin Kabak and Abhishek Banerjee excel at delivering comedic timing as well as dramatic touches. Kriti Sanon gets limited screen time, yet she tries everything she can to avoid being overshadowed. Overall, Bhediya is a film that one can watch again and again, but for a great cinematic experience, watch it only on the big screen.

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