Darlings movie review: Black comedy on marital violence, deliver knockout performances by Alia Bhatt, Shefali Shah, Vijay Varma

Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Share on telegram
Darling is a watchable film that carves out its own path while judiciously utilizing genre elements and eschewing traditional narrative
Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Share on telegram
Darlings movie review: Black comedy on marital violence, deliver knockout performances by Alia Bhatt, Shefali Shah, Vijay Varma
Darlings movie review: Black comedy on marital violence, deliver knockout performances by Alia Bhatt, Shefali Shah, Vijay Varma

As the first movie for Alia Bhatt’s production company, she chose a delicate subject like domestic violence.

The story has been portrayed as a black comedy rather than making a hard-hitting film on it.

However, it is the characters’ aspirations and desperation that will stick with you long after the final credits have rolled.

The writer-director Darlings Jasmeet K Reen effortlessly manages to execute the mighty task.

Even while the teaser itself only shows a small portion of the Darlings’ world, the dark comedy nonetheless has a lot to offer in its little more than two-hour running duration. 

Though at no point does the film seem lengthy, major credit for it goes to editor Nitin Baid.

The main character of Darlings is Badrunissa Sheikh aka Badru (Alia Bhatt), a determined woman who makes every effort to rescue her failing or, more accurately, failed marriage with husband Hamza Sheikh (Vijay Varma).

This comedy-drama becomes somewhat darker as a result of a tragic incident, compelling Badru and her mother Shamshunissa Sheikh (Shefali Shah) to act independently.

This film, directed by Jasmeet K. Reen, makes a powerful point about domestic abuse. It may elicit a variety of perspectives regarding the approach the director has taken to make her point, but maybe it will at least spark a lot more discussion on the matter.

The movie has more to offer than just that. It also causes you to reflect on issues like alcoholism and its effects on families, superstition, cunning, envy, karma, and the influence of parents’ life and decisions on their children.

All these topics have been beautifully weaved in a story, but almost all are presented in an entertaining manner.

Characters have been sketched out well with the right amount of contrast, grey shades, and innocence, which makes them both real and relatable.

Alia Bhatt’s character Badrunissa falls in love with and marries Hamza (Vijay Varma), an alcoholic who beats his wife. The girl receives daily encouragement from her mother Shamshunnisa (Shefali Shah), who lives in the same chawl in Byculla, to leave her abusive husband.

Alia, like many other women, is still hopeful. She wants to have children with her spouse, realise the aspirations she had for him, and never stops trying to change him.

Many of us strong, independent women who wouldn’t tolerate abusive conduct for even a day would find the movie upsetting. You would be enraged and angry by darlings, especially after seeing movies like Thappad.

But you’ll have to put your moral principles aside and try to comprehend Badru’s need to maintain their relationship while patiently awaiting the point at which her patience runs out.

Alia Bhatt does an excellent job portraying the naive wife who thinks she can influence her husband. As would be anticipated from someone who has produced Udta Punjab, Gully Boy, and Gangubai Kathiawadi, she also carries the movie as an actor. Badru occasionally makes you think of Safeena from Gully Boy.

Vijay Varma appears to have mastered the use of grey-shaded characters, crying crocodile tears to obtain what he wants and changing quickly from a loving husband to a vicious demon.

Shefali portrays a pragmatic mother who tries to convey to her daughter the truth about her marriage. She is frequently the main source of comic relief in scenes and effortlessly carries off the quirky role. Alia and Shefali make for excellent on-screen mothers and daughters.

The performances of Alia Bhatt, Shefali Shah and Vijay Varma are the brightest parts in this otherwise grim reality that the film represents.

Darlings is a watchable film that carves out its own path while judiciously utilizing genre elements and eschewing traditional narrative cliches.

Related Post