Environment researchers seek ‘Ramsar Site’ tag for Chandubi Lake

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The recognition has been sought as Chandubi lake can transform the waterbody’s socio-economic and environmental needs.
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Environment researchers seek 'Ramsar Site' tag for Chandubi Lake
Chandubi Lake | Image credit: carforsure

Guwahati: Environment researchers have urged the state government for a proposal to Centre seeking ‘Ramsar Site’ tag for the Chandubi Lake in Assam.

The recognition has been sought as it can transform the waterbody’s socio-economic and environmental needs.

Currently, Assam has only one Ramsar Site which is Guwahati’s Deepor Beel. Chandubi, however, is rich in natural resources and has a potential to generate livelihood.

According to a report by TOI, Deepak Kumar of the United Nations Development Programme and Guwahati-based researcher Moharana Choudhury has assessed the economic value of Chandubi. They believe that the wetland has an immense potential to earn the Ramsar Site recognition.

Quoted by TOI, Choudhury said, “We tried to produce a broader picture of the monetary evaluation of this wetland within our limited resources so that people can understand the used and non-used values of wetlands and their potential role in driving sustainable development goals.”

“We have done commendable research on the ecosystem valuation of Chandubi. Despite inadequate and insufficient data, we estimated the monetary value of Chandubi ranging from a minimum of 3,479 to 17,31,690 per hectare per year at the dollar prices during our research,” he added.

Chandubi lake was formed in 1897 as the result of a major earthquake in the region during which a forest area went down and became a lake. Since then, the lake has evolved to become a critical habitat for flora and fauna.

Located at the foot of the Garo Hills, the lake is a biodiversity hotspot with a surrounding forest area and the Kulsi river flowing in close vicinity. It is home to dozens of fish species including some critically endangered species such as Nandhanl and ornamental fish such as phutiki-puthi.

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