KGF Chapter 2 movie review: Yash’s film is an explosive tale of raw machismo, a lot of fury

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K.G.F. Chapter 2 is a three-hour long drone that is nonstop and ear-splitting.
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KGF Chapter 2 movie review: Yash's film is an explosive tale of raw machismo, a lot of fury
KGF Chapter 2 movie review: Yash's film is an explosive tale of raw machismo, a lot of fury

KGF: Chapter 2, which released in Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, and Malayalam theatres on April 14, is a smash hit.

The Yash-starrer crushed additional records across India on its opening day, breaking the day one gross of all post-pandemic films with merely advance bookings. The Hindi version of the film has been India’s most successful opening weekend.

The setting of KGF part one (2018) was the most remarkable aspect of the film. At every chance, the camera was pulled all the way back to give us a bird’s eye perspective of the huge gold mines of Kolar, buried deep beneath the earth, and the millions of faceless men and women toiling away below. 

Slaves, actually yoked to their back-breaking labour without pause, trampled by their cruel lords’ iron feet. The only nice thing about K.G.F. Chapter 2 is that you know exactly what you’re getting yourself into. Chapter 1 has established that Raja Krishnappa Beria, commonly known as Rocky, is not the typical gangster. He is not accompanied by a gang. He’s a lone wolf with a ravenous appetite.

Yash revelled in portraying a hero with the might of a battalion, an act that pushed him and the film into national attention. After establishing his individual suzerainty over the Kolar Gold Fields in the second instalment of the story, the protagonist proceeds down the same road, pushing over anybody and everything in his way. The film is gasping for air.

K.G.F. Chapter 2 is a three-hour long drone that is nonstop and ear-splitting. Even if your brain survives the assault, the chances of your eardrums surviving are small. The picture does not give itself any breathing room, either in terms of tempo or in terms of what it loads on the audio.

Women are the worst victims in this toxically masculine environment. They, like the protagonist Reena Desai (Srinidhi Shetty), either stand by and do the men’s bidding – Rocky declares to the girl’s face straight at the start, “you are my entertainment,” which is designed to sound cool – or haplessly weep and shout in the hope of being saved from their predicament.

There’s a lot of fuss in Narachi about a girl child who hasn’t been killed at birth as a convenient tokenism. The older ladies in the mining region, once ruled by vicious rulers and now under the leadership of the benevolent hero – a minimally better version of the men from whom he has snatched power – have their backs to the wall at all times.

The death of legendary journalist and writer Anand Ingalagi opens Chapter 2 of K.G.F. His narrative of the rise and fall of Rocky, an orphan youngster who met his fate in Bombay’s cruel underworld, is left unfinished. Deepa Hegde (Malavika Avinash), the head of the TV station, is unsure who will bring the story to a (il)logical conclusion.

Vijayendra (Prakash Raj), Anand Ingalagi’s estranged son, has no reason to mourn his father’s death but can’t resist the temptation to finish what the departed raconteur, the author of a prohibited book on the Kolar Gold Fields and Rocky’s role in its history, began.

 Rocky, sounding eerily like Gordon Gekko, adds that greed is good, that greed is progress. The premise of the film pits the hero against a slew of characters who are just as ambitious and aggressive as he is. As a result, conflict abounds throughout Chapter 2 of K.G.F.

Yash (‘Rocking Star’ is prefixed to his name in the opening credits) is firmly on the back of the picture, which gallops like a runaway horse. The soldiers who earlier swore allegiance to Garuda (Ramachandra Raju), the Narachi Limestone Corporation owner’s ambitious son who died at Rocky’s hands in the previous chapter, are now his adversaries.

Rocky, on the other hand, leaves no doubt about his intention to run KGF from now on. The villainous politician Guru Pandian (Achyuth Kumar), the heroine’s father Rajendra Desai (Lakki Lakshman), and Andrews (B.S. Avinash) aren’t the only ones Rocky must contend with as he turns from a mercenary in search of glory to a leader of the impoverished goldminers.

Adheera (Sanjay Dutt) rises from the dead, new Prime Minister Ramika Sen (Raveena Tandon) vows to demolish the KGF empire, and senior CBI officer Kanneganti Raghavan (Rao Ramesh) gathers all the ammunition he and his team will need to put an end to the country’s most notorious criminal’s reign.

K.G.F. Chapter 2 is persistent in its quest of high drama and unfettered action – one scene follows another in a nonstop display of cinematic excess that keeps the medium’s niceties from getting lost in the muck.

The main action moments, which are staged with finesse but without any sense of surprise or realism, appear and feel mechanical because we know the hero will not suffer great harm.

Chapter 2 of K.G.F. is a battering ram of a film. Its purpose is to beat the audience into submission. It’s exclusively for Yash lovers and people who consider sensory overload to be a sort of cinema. K.G.F. Chapter, on the other hand, is best avoided if you value your eardrums and have had your fill of the super-heroic deeds of an underdog-turned-top dog hero.

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