Sita Ramam review: Dulquer Salmaan, Mrunal Thakur starrer presents romance drama amid conflict between Indo-Pak

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The Telugu version received a fantastic response from critics, and audiences and did very well at the box office in the Telugu markets.
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Sita Ramam review: Dulquer Salmaan, Mrunal Thakur starrer presents romance drama of Indo-Pak conflict
Sita Ramam review: Dulquer Salmaan, Mrunal Thakur starrer presents romance drama of Indo-Pak conflict

Sita Ramam starring Dulquer Salmaan, Mrunal Thakur, and Rashmika Mandanna, released the Hindi dubbed version of the film ‘Sita Ramam’ in theatres today

The Telugu version received a fantastic response from critics, and audiences and did very well at the box office in the Telugu markets.

In the era of steam engines, snail mail, and suspension of disbelief, Sita Ramam takes place between the 1960s and the 1980s. The story revolves around a patriotic genre, where Dulquer Salmaan is playing an Army officer.

In this film, it is suggested that humanity matters more than color, caste, or boundaries.

On the instructions of her grandfather Tariq (Sachin Khedekar), Afreen, a Pakistani national, travels to India all the way from London in 1985 to deliver an unposted letter from Ram to his beloved Sita. She must locate Ram, Sita, or both in order to receive Afreen’s inheritance.

The letter is the final chapter in a love story that starts in 1965 when Indian Army soldier Ram (Dulquer Salmaan) protects a Kashmiri village by alone from Pakistan-aided attackers. Sacks of letters of admiration for Ram arrive, including heartfelt ones from Sitamahalakshmi (Mrunal Thakur).

Although they haven’t yet met, the handsome young man finds Sita’s straightforward declaration that Ram is her ideal consort to be an enticing lure. When Ram locates Sita, the chemistry between them is strong enough for Ram to arrange a wedding. However, Sita is being held back by a secret that Raghavapudi has to invent an alternate history to explain.

That alternative history includes the Nizam era in Hyderabad, the conflict between India and Pakistan over Kashmir, and the complex issue of relations between Hindus and Muslims. The bloated screenplay by Raghavapudi finds numerous methods to avoid the straightforward entanglement at the center of the story. The plot of the film jumps back and forth between the 1960s and the present, where Afreen learns the truth about Sita and Ram, and the present, where Afreen discovers it.

After the intermission, Raghavapudi’s grip on his credulity-defying conceit significantly erodes.

The cameos, which feature Tarun Bhascker as Afreen’s local contact and Sita’s opportunistic brother Jishu Sengupta, Ashwath Bhatt as a stereotypically wicked Pakistani militant, and Sumanth as Ram’s menial superior, continually detract from the main romance.

Shatru is good as Ram’s fellow soldier, while Sachin Khedekar, Gautham Menon, Prakash Raj, Vennela Kishore, and Tharun Bhascker are fine. 

This movie shines at the blending of suspense and astounding execution. Depending on the situation, the background music by Vishal Chandrasekhar is both charming and intense. The songs—starting with chart-toppers like “Oh Sita Hey Rama” and “Inthandham,” which are adjusted to montages—acquire dignified settings of their own. Their placement is always appropriate. The PS Vinod-Shreyaas Krishna team’s cinematography is mesmerizing and up to par with the best Bollywood productions.

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